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Holocaust Memorial Fellow Tomaz Jardim to Speak Here March 17

Tomaz Jardim will discuss “The Mauthausen Concentration Case and American Justice in Germany,” at 5 p.m., Wednesday, March 17 in the Jepson Center’s Wolff Auditorium. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.

Tomaz Jardim will discuss “The Mauthausen Concentration Case and American Justice in Germany,” at 5 p.m., Wednesday, March 17 in the Jepson Center’s Wolff Auditorium. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Holocaust Museum.

Tomaz Jardim, a research fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, will discuss “The Mauthausen Concentration Case and American Justice in Germany,” at 5 p.m., Wednesday, March 17 in the Jepson Center’s Wolff Auditorium.

The event is free and open to the public. It is sponsored by Gonzaga’s history department, the Gonzaga Institute for Action Against Hate, the Phi Alpha Theta history honor society, and the Campus Outreach Lecture Program of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, supported by the generosity of Jack and Goldie Wolfe Miller. Light refreshments will be provided.

Jardim studied the 1946 Mauthausen War Crimes Trial, which involved more than 60 perpetrators from one of the most notorious Nazi concentration camps, and has remained virtually absent from the historiography of the Holocaust. He is the 2009–2010 Laurie and Andy Okun Fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies.

Among other issues, Jardim examined the controversial “parent trial system” as well as the concept of a “common design to commit war crimes,” both of which were employed by the American Army to prosecute hundreds of perpetrators in the shortest period of time law would allow.  Jardim explored the contemporary perceptions of Nazi criminality that the trial reveals, and assessed the role of the Mauthausen trial in shaping the historical memory of the Holocaust. He used the Museum’s oral history collection, as well as the American Gathering Conference Collection.

Jardim earned a master’s degree in history at the University of Toronto and a bachelor’s degree with honors from Trent University. He is the recipient of several fellowships and awards for his research, including an Ontario Graduate Scholarship; the Bagnany Award for Excellence in the Field of History, Trent University; and the Diane and Howard Wohl Fellowship from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

During fall semester 2009, he taught a course on the Holocaust, plus two other courses in the history department at Pacific Lutheran University.  He recently completed his doctoral dissertation at University of Toronto on the topic of Mauthausen. He has served as a fact-checker and abstract writer for Holocaust memoirs submitted for publication to the Azrieli Foundation.

Jardim also has worked as a teaching assistant at the University of Toronto and has taught history seminar groups on the Holocaust, lecturing on many Holocaust-related topics. In addition, he is a musician and is fluent in German.

For more information, please contact Kevin O’Connor, associate professor of history at Gonzaga, at (509) 313-6694.

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