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Gonzaga U. Hosts 10th Annual Spokane Intercollegiate Research Conference April 21

GU students’ research ranges from Julia Hubbard’s, “What is So Super about Living Near a Superfund Site?” to Andrew Cataldo’s “The Blame Game: Obesity and Perceptions of Responsibility.” Photo by Jennifer Raudebaugh

GU students’ research ranges from Julia Hubbard’s, “What is So Super about Living Near a Superfund Site?” to Andrew Cataldo’s “The Blame Game: Obesity and Perceptions of Responsibility.” Photo by Jennifer Raudebaugh

179 GU Students to Present Original Scholarly Research

SPOKANE, Wash.Gonzaga University – in collaboration with other Inland Northwest institutions of higher learning – hosts the 10th annual Spokane Intercollegiate Research Conference Saturday, April 21. The event culminates 2012 National Undergraduate Research Week (April 6-20) and provides opportunities for students at Gonzaga, Whitworth University, Washington State University-Spokane, Eastern Washington University and the Community Colleges of Spokane to present original research across all disciplines.

Undergraduate research extends beyond the sciences to the arts, humanities, and social sciences. The keynote speaker is Erica Flapan, a mathematician and the Lingurn H. Burkhead Professor of Mathematics at Pomona College in Claremont, Calif. Flapan is credited with helping to establish a common language between scientists and mathematicians, making interdisciplinary research easier.

One-hundred and seventy-nine Gonzaga students will present original scholarly research. Photo by Jennifer Raudebaugh.

Her address will provide examples of mirror-image symmetry in various contexts, for example, from music to poetry and sports to people. Patricia Terry, associate dean of Gonzaga’s College of Arts and Sciences, is organizing the daylong event in College Hall. Terry says 179 Gonzaga students will present original scholarly research. The conference promotes student research performed in partnership with faculty or other mentors. GU students’ research ranges from Julia Hubbard’s, “What is So Super about Living Near a Superfund Site?” to Andrew Cataldo’s “The Blame Game: Obesity and Perceptions of Responsibility.”

Student-researchers, who will convey their findings in panels or poster presentations, gain experience in constructing and applying knowledge, building mentor relationships with faculty, and communicating to a wider audience.

For more information about SIRC, visit its website or contact Patricia Terry at (509) 313-3885 or via e-mail.

 

 

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